Yes. Halloween is indeed over. But, that doesn’t mean I can’t relish and rank the horror genre all year long.

Top Ten International Horror Flicks and their respective grapes:

The Descent

The Descent

1) The Descent (by Scottish director Neil Marshal / 2005): a claustrophobic and bloody masterpiece that hinges on the dark side of feminine potency, as suggested by the Bacchus grape’s namesake.

2) [REC] (by Catalan directors Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza / 2007): a TV crew follows a couple of firefighters into a den of Catalan heathens. Add another expression of Spain’s rambunctious spirit: the Tempranillo grape.

High Tension

High Tension

3) High Tension (by French director Alexandre Aja / 2003): a change in environment is anything but a serene, rural French escape for two urbane Parisians. Its hidden layers may even rival those of the heady and spicy Malbec grape.

4) Texas Chainsaw Massacre (by American director Tobe Hooper / 1974): this movie instilled in me a nasty distaste and uncontrollable fear of Texas. “Bits and pieces” feature prominently in the movie’s unholy arch, so why shouldn’t they in your wine selection! A Grenache-Syrah blend provides an elegant coordination that both offsets and parallels the characters’ unforgettable demise.

5) Lake Mungo (by Australian director Joel Anderson / 2008): I wrote earlier about my new Australian gem that echoes the enticing themes of Twin Peaks. Much like the main character’s own double life, the Shiraz (aka., Syrah) has maintained its own duel identity. But, whether sampling it in its Australian or French guise, its intense color and frenetic palate will not disappoint.

6) 28 Days Later (by English director Danny Boyle / 2002): this film is a tour de force that follows our dear hero, played by the beautiful Cillian Murphy, as he wakes up after a viral infestation that leaves behind a post-apocalyptic England. The director has his own fun by presenting alternative endings; if more than one ending sounds good to you, pair this movie with a bottle of Chardonnay. Actually, I mean two. One aged in stainless steel and one aged in French Oak.

Tale of 2 Sisters

Tale of 2 Sisters

7) A Tale of Two Sisters (by South Korean director Ji-woon Kim / 2003): this film interweaves elegant cinematography and timeless themes: a mother lost during adolescence, the intrusion of a younger woman, and two sisters who form an unhealthy co-dependance. The Cabernet Franc, ancient, rich, heavy, and complicated, mirrors the movie’s refined filming and undying themes.

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